Red Bull & Ford Risk New Engine Factory in 2026

Christian Horner, the boss of Red Bull Racing, is taking a risk by setting up his own engine factory, Red Bull Powertrains, in partnership with Ford, with the aim of being competitive by 2026, a move prompted by Honda ending its partnership with Red Bull.

Highlights

‣ Christian Horner, Red Bull Racing team boss, is setting up his own engine factory, Red Bull Powertrains, in partnership with Ford, aiming to be competitive by 2026.
‣ Red Bull has always relied on an engine supplier since its inception in 2005, but plans to change this by building its own engine in 2026.
‣ The move to build their own engines is a risk for Red Bull, but one they believe will pay off in the long term.
‣ The decision to design their own engines was somewhat forced after Honda ended their partnership with Red Bull. Honda will return to F1 in 2026, but will partner with Aston Martin instead.


Christian Horner? Yeah, he’s taking a big risk. Setting up his own engine factory? That’s a gamble. And he knows it. Red Bull Powertrains, in partnership with Ford, has to be competitive by 2026. The pressure? It’s all on Horner, the boss of the Red Bull Racing team.

Red Bull? They’ve always relied on an engine supplier since they started in 2005. Unlike the big boys – Ferrari, Mercedes, Renault – they’ve never built their own engine. But that’s about to change. 2026 is the year. The year Red Bull unveils its own engine, the Red Bull Powertrain. And they’ve got Ford, the US giant, helping them technically.

Why is Red Bull Powertrains a risk for Horner? Let’s dive in.

“We’ve invested in the UK with our partners, Ford included, to have the engine facility on campus. Now we’ve got a factory, state-of-the-art facilities, and close to 500 people working on the 2026 engine,” Horner told Sky Sports. He’s the team principal of Max Verstappen and Sergio Perez, in case you didn’t know.

“But going from nothing to taking on Mercedes, Ferrari, Honda, Renault, and Audi? It’s a bold move. We’re looking forward to it, but it’s a risk. We think it’ll pay off in the long term, though.”

Red Bull was kinda forced to design its own engines. Why? Honda pulled the plug on the partnership. Honda’s coming back to F1 in 2026, but they’re partnering with Aston Martin. With the new engine regulations in 2026, there will be six engine manufacturers at the start of the F1 season. So, it’s gonna be interesting.

Albert Ramirez
Albert Ramirez
Albert Ramirez is a senior writer at F1Highlights.com. With a passion for motorsports, Albert brings a unique perspective to the world of Formula One. With over five years of experience as a sports reporter, he has honed his skills in capturing the essence of the sport.

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