Russell Panics After Crash, FIA Ignores Red Flag Request

George Russell crashed during the final lap of the Australian Grand Prix while battling for sixth place, called for a red flag due to his position on the track, but the FIA opted for double yellows and a virtual safety car instead, allowing the race to conclude safely.

Highlights

‣ George Russell crashed from seventh place on the final lap of the Australian Grand Prix, battling for P6 with Fernando Alonso.

‣ Russell was surprised by a manoeuvre from Alonso, leading to his crash.

‣ After the crash, Russell urgently requested a red flag through his team radio, fearing for safety as he was in the middle of the track.

‣ Despite Russell’s pleas, the FIA opted for double yellow flags and a virtual safety car instead of a red flag, allowing the race to conclude safely.


George Russell’s race took a dramatic turn on the last lap of the Australian Grand Prix. He was fighting for sixth place, neck and neck with Fernando Alonso. Then, out of the blue, Alonso pulled a fast one. Russell didn’t see it coming and crashed.

He was desperate for a red flag after the crash. But, guess what? The FIA didn’t even blink.

On his team radio, Russell was all panic and urgency. “Red flag, red flag, red flag. I’m smack dab in the middle of the track. Red flag, red flag. Red, red, red. Right in the middle, red. F*cking hell.” Despite his pleas, the FIA chose a different path.

Instead of the red flag Russell was hoping for, the officials opted for double yellows and a virtual safety car. Double yellows mean “watch out, major crash ahead.” It’s a way to warn drivers that the track is not all clear. This decision, though not what Russell wanted, did help the race conclude without further incidents.

Oh, and if you’re curious about Russell’s frantic calls for a red flag, there’s a link to the audio. It’s quite something to hear.

Albert Ramirez
Albert Ramirez
Albert Ramirez is a senior writer at F1Highlights.com. With a passion for motorsports, Albert brings a unique perspective to the world of Formula One. With over five years of experience as a sports reporter, he has honed his skills in capturing the essence of the sport.

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